3 Things I learned Getting Ready for College

While not everyone goes to college, the tendency of young people to choose this path is getting more and more prominent. As the undergraduate degree becomes more common the costs have gone up significantly. I am attending a private College called Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids MI.

Here are some things I learned as I prepared for this journey:

1. College Is Expensive

While I certainly have been given much in life (including amazing parents, a healthy body, and uplifting friends) free college is not one of them. Paying for college is the largest expense most young people face heading into adulthood. Tackling massive or even moderate debt down the road can take tremendous time and energy.

My parents, as many readers may know, are currently involved in missions work in Zambia, Africa. Because of this tight situation financially and their belief that it is my responsibility to pay for school (which I happen to believe with), I have taken it upon myself to pay for school debt free.

The cost to attend college is going to run about $13K per year for me. While this is definitely a lot more than some state schools in which the student receive some sort of financial assistance, there are many schools out there that cost tremendously more. I plan on working both during the summer and during the semester to pay for this expense.

2. The most important things are getting the degree and meeting people

Even more crucial in college than grades or extra credit is the people you meet (connections) and the degree you get (credentials). Coming out of college which will matter more, the fact that you have a bachelor’s degree in business administration, or the fact that you got amazing grades? The degree, in my mind is much more of a stand out feature than the grades themselves.

I truly believe that from a financial perspective, grades are less important than the experience you gain and the credentials and knowledge you acquire. While grades are certainly helpful to have, they shouldn’t be the end destination of every college senior.

3. College Students are Still Considered “Kids”

The last thing I’ve realized is that while college students are technically considered adults, they aren’t, by the middle aged and older crowd, considered real adults. I don’t necessarily agree with this by itself, but it gets a bit annoying for me being called “college kid” when I know that my actions say anything but.

Whether you’re a freshmen entering your undergraduate studies, or a senior wrapping up the last official school of your life, remember: college isn’t the ending point, only a beginning.

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