Tag Archives: career

3 Factors to Look at When Determining Where to Live

As a financial blog, I have dealt a lot with individual personal finance issues, like what to invest in, how to budget, and what to do in different areas financially. Here I want to step back and cover 3 financial factors that you should think about when considering a city to live in. While these three aren’t the only things to think about, they certainly will cover the broad range of financial determining factors:

Job and Career Potential

Here you’re just trying to get an idea as to how easy or hard it will be to have employment, and sustain employment in your chosen career field. Two of the things to consider are the unemployment rate, which is a good indicator of how many people who want jobs have them, and job growth. With job growth you want to look at the number of new jobs being created, specifically in your career field, over the last decade.

Cost of Living

Housing costs will be broken down into to two big areas: housing and everything else. When looking at housing, there are usually two broad options available. You can either rent or you can buy. You are going to want to compare the costs of rent vs the rest of the country. Pay special attention to the rent increases. For example maybe your area currently has slightly higher rents than the national average, but over the last couple years the rents have been skyrocketing. You want to be mindful of areas in which the costs of living, including rents are rising quickly.

The second housing option to look at is homeownership. What is the average costs of a home in the area. This can vary greatly from one neighborhood to another. For example one neighborhood might costs $300,000 but just across the road might be $250,000 for a similar house. Find the area you’re thinking about and start comparing prices.

After paying for housing there are the rest of the general costs associated with living and breathing. These costs can include food, insurance, transportation, recreation, and especially taxes. Taxes are a huge part of your yearly expenses. There are income taxes (both federal, state and sometimes city), as well as sales tax and property tax. Look at these rates for you area.

Long-Term Stability

The last thing you want to look at after job potential and cost of living is the general stability in the area. The stability of the area is both the economic factors and the political factors.

For example look at one of the leading factors of growth for cities: population growth. Take a look at the recent trend in population. For example are massive amounts of people entering or leaving the area? This might be a sign that things are changing. With the change in demographics and population comes changes in political preferences.

Maybe these changes will lead to political leadership upheaval in the local government. Think about how these changes could potentially impact your life in terms of local taxes, regulations, social programs, and building projects in the future. Are you okay with these potential changes and the uncertainty that comes with them?

Conclusion:

Overall, these three factors can paint a pretty clear picture of the financial concerns about one area over another. After going through them, you should know whether this area is something you would want to consider moving to. Naturally though, there will be others things of concern, like climate, education, health and other issues. While these concerns might not directly impact your finances, most of them should be looked at closely for the effects they could have down the road.

Pursue a “Normal” Career or Become an Entrepreneur?

With the rise of social media marketing, the technological advancements with commerce, and the general business sentiment in the U.S. rising, many young people(as well as older people) are finding entrepreneurship as an increasingly appealing life choice. I would say as with most trends, there is both bad and good aspects.

On one hand entrepreneurship is what America is built on. From Ford Motor Co. to Apple Computers, companies that are able to provide what customers want will always succeed. However, there is a new mentality emerging that entrepreneurship is “fun” or that simply by starting a company you are instantly successful.

By very definition only 1% can become the 1%, which is why thousands of businesses fail each year. Starting a business can be exciting, rewarding, and profitable, but it probably won’t be “fun” in the conventional understanding of the word.

When starting a business ask yourself, “why am I starting this business?” This question helps you understand yourself. And then ask, “Is there need for my product or service?” This helps you understand the customer. And lastly ask, “What’s the best (most efficient, effective, and customer-centered) way of bringing my products and services to my market? This question will help you understand your action steps.

After asking those questions you’ll have an idea as to where your mind is at, where the customers’ minds are at, and where your next actions should be. While answering these questions thoroughly might not be easy, it will be highly beneficial to any rising entrepreneur.

Action steps: Ask yourself, “Why am I starting this business?”